12 Tech Companies Who Are Proactive About Being Green

The go green movement is strong here in the United States. From large multinational companies like Walmart to my local coffee shop, sustainable business practices are cropping up everywhere – including the tech sector. These 12 tech companies are proactive about being green – not simply saying that they are green but actually backing up their statements with actions.

Google
Google GoatsWhen I think “tech company” the first thing that comes to mind is Google. Google has a comprehensive sustainability plan in place, including some rather creative eco-friendly measures. For one week each spring, the fields near Google’s Mountain View headquarters are filled with goats. The goats essentially mow and fertilize the lawn. No noisy polluting lawn mowers and no chemical-ridden fertilizers. Instead, the goats hang out for a week and take care of business, literally.

pair Networks
Although there are several eco-conscious hosting providers to choose from, pair Networks has been green since before going green was so trendy. Since August of 2007, pair Networks’ operations and facilities have been carbon neutral. Learn more by reading the pair Networks Environmental Policy.

CO2Stats
If you’re hoping to achieve pair Networks’ carbon neutral status with your site then CO2Stats can help you. Even if you host with pair, you need to offset your visitors’ carbon footprints. When you sign up with CO2Stats you’ll be able to offset your site’s carbon footprint, receive carbon footprint reduction tips and receive a customized badge to let your customers know that you’re dedicated to carbon neutrality.

Cisco
Cisco is another eco-friendly leader in the tech industry. The company has made Fortune’s list of the 100 Best Companies to Work For since the list originated in 1998. One reason it made 2011’s list is that it has “one of the highest percentages of telecommuters.” Telecommuting saves money in energy costs and reduces tailpipe emissions by eliminating commutes.

Nokia
Nokia was once again recognized as the world’s most sustainable technology company on the 2010/2011 Dow Jones Sustainability Index. Green initiatives at this Finland-based company include an electronics take-back and recycling program, a focus on human rights and multi-year energy use reduction goals.

Dell
Dell Computers topped the 2010 Newsweek Green Rankings due in part to its aggressive goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions at the company by 40% by 2015. Dell is also focusing on reducing the environmental impact of its product line with a 25% energy use reduction in both its laptop and desktop models.

Intel
In 2010, Intel was named the Greenest Company in America by Forbes magazine. One of Intel’s biggest eco-initiatives is in the green energy arena. According to Forbes, the company uses 1.43 billion kWh of energy annually but 51% comes from renewable sources like solar, wind, geothermal and biomass.

OnRamp
Based in Austin, Texas, OnRamp provides a variety of products and services to customers including colocation, managed servers, disaster recovery and more. The facility also offers its customers peace of mind knowing that the company is powered by 100% renewable energy. Learn more: Austin’s Original Green Internet Company.

Salesforce.com
Salesforce.com earned the top spot on the Fortune Magazine’s 25 Top-Paying Companies list. The company not only pays its associates well, it does so while being respectful of the environment. The company’s environmental policy statement includes LEED green building certification goals, recycling and composting programs, and the reduction of non-essential business travel by using videoconferencing technology.

Rackspace
Rackspace, which was recently featured in the post 7 Tools That Make It Easier to Run an SAAS, is another eco-friendly tech company. The company’s Texas headquarters carries a LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the largest green building certification program in the world. Rackspace also has a tool that allows customers to calculate their company’s carbon footprint. The tool then provides information on reducing their environmental impact.

Adobe
Adobe has been a major player in the tech and environmental arenas for years. The company is home to three LEED Platinum certified buildings, the highest green building rating available from the USGBC. The employees are also active in the go green movement with approximately 97 percent of office waste generated at the San Jose location either recycled or otherwise diverted from landfills.

Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard has its hands in all parts of the tech sector – from computers to networking equipment to calculators and software. The company also has its hands in all parts of the sustainability movement with initiatives that focus on waste and energy reduction, a partnership with the World Wildlife Fund focusing on climate change research, and reducing the use of toxic chemicals in its products.

Do you have a favorite tech company that is also proactive about being green?


Photo: DoNotLick/Flickr

About Melissa Hincha-Ownby

Melissa is a tech geek that loves writing, loves her kids and loves a little controversy. She's raising two next-gen bloggers to take her place one day.

Comments

  1. HP, you gotta be kidding! They sell disposable quality printers that burn ink like nobody’s business, which people toss when they break and get another one. I’ve spoken with one of their Advertising/PR people a while back and they said their objective is to ‘get people to print’ – hardly green in any way, other than maybe greenwashing.

    It’s nearly impossible to be a green company when selling consumer products. Companies might be better than they were years ago, but they’re still trying to sell as many plastic, low durability products as possible – which usually end up in landfills. Most of these are manufactured thousands of miles away from their consumer delivery location and cost an immense amount of petroleum to make and transport.

    This doesn’t do us any environmental favors and is not ‘green’ at all.